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Monarch Bronc

Edition of 5 pieces
B05 BRONC

Monarch Bronc

B05 BRONC

This beautiful knife features a hand-engraved bolster with 24K gold inlay by the Don Patch, and scale in desert ironwood. The blade is hand-forged 'Hornets Nest' damascus by Mike Norris; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with citrines. The Monarch is a simple design that is easy on the eye and effortless in the hand; the elegant shape of the handle on this design is also an ideal canvas to showcase fine hand-engraving or exotic materials. This engraved piece features the rich and unique synthesis between function, exotic materials, and the superlative artistry that is the hallmark of William Henry's collection.

Features & Specs

  • Dimensions: 
  • Blade 2.63" (66.8mm)
    Handle 3.58" (90.9mm)
    Overall open 6.00" (152.4mm)

All William Henry knives feature a unique serial number which is engraved into the blade to assure the authenticity and lifetime traceability of the product

Serialnumber

This knife is shipped in an elegant wood presentation box, and it includes a pocket clipcase made from soft, high-grade leather, with an integrated stainless steel pocket clip

Clipcase

Monarch Bronc
Edition of 5 pieces
B05 BRONC
$4,500.00
Out of Stock

Materials

Hand-forged damascus material image

Hand-forged damascus

Damascus steel was a term used by several Western cultures from the Medieval period onward to describe a type of steel created in India and used in swordmaking from about 300 BC to 1700 AD. These swords were characterized by distinctive patterns of banding and mottling reminiscent of flowing water. Such blades were reputed to be not only tough and resistant to shattering, but capable of being honed to a sharp and resilient edge. William Henry's damascus is made from several types of steel welded together to form a billet.
The patterns vary depending on how the damascus artist works the billet. The billet is drawn out and folded until the desired number of layers are formed. William Henry damascus billets are forged with a minimum of 300 layers. William Henry works with a handful of the very best damascus artists/forgers in the U.S.

Fine hand-engraving material image

Fine hand-engraving

Engraving is one of the most recognized and exacting adornments on metal, and most of our engraving is done on stainless steel, and occasionally - on Titanium, adding layers of difficulty to the process. William Henry works with a select group of world-famous master engravers to create very limited edition pieces on an ongoing basis. Each edition, or piece, is carefully conceived and executed by William Henry and the engraver, and every finished engraving is hand-signed by the artist.

Gold-inlaid Engraving is another, even more complex, rendition of a classic art form. This involves creating a fine engraving with deep relief, then inlaying 24K gold (or different metals) into select portions of the engraving. If done in damascus, we then heat-color the frame which creates a beautiful darker background to highlight the gold inlay.

Desert Ironwood material image

Desert Ironwood

Our Desert Ironwood is sourced responsibly from Arizona and Northern Mexico, from the lower reaches of the Sonoran desert. It is very hard, very dense, and is one of a handful of woods that sinks in water. Ironwood also features some of the highest contrast and striking patterns of any wood in the world. Once used by the Seri Native Americans of Mexico for tool handles, we proudly offer premium grade ironwood on a variety of William Henry tools.

Citrine material image

Citrine

Citrine is a variety of quartz whose color ranges from a pale yellow to brown due to ferric impurities.
The name is derived from Latin citrina which means "yellow" and is also the origin of the word "citron." Sometimes citrine and amethyst can be found together in the same crystal, which is then referred to as ametrine. 

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