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Spearpoint Star Struck - Carefree Buffalo Exclusive Product Image
Spearpoint Star Struck - Carefree Buffalo Exclusive Product Image
Spearpoint Star Struck - Carefree Buffalo Exclusive Product Image
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Spearpoint Star Struck - Carefree Buffalo Exclusive Product Thumbnail
Spearpoint Star Struck - Carefree Buffalo Exclusive Product Thumbnail

Spearpoint Star Struck - Carefree Buffalo Exclusive

B12 C.B. STAR STRUCK

Spearpoint Star Struck - Carefree Buffalo Exclusive

B12 C.B. STAR STRUCK

The Spearpoint 'Carefree Buffalo Star Struck' is an Exclusive Edition featuring a beautiful frame in mokume gane by Mike Sakmar, inlaid with a mesmerizing meteorite scale (a section of the Gibeon meteorite which fell in the desert of Namibia in prehistoric times). The blade is hand-forged 'Hornets Nest' damascus by Mike Norris; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with citrine gemstones.
A remarkable design with a full-size secure grip and versatile deep-belly blade, the Spearpoint epitomizes William Henrys core philosophy: superlative function deserves to be elevated to superlative art. The 'Carefree Buffalo Star Struck' features some of the exotic materials that are the hallmark of William Henry's collections; a timeless heirloom to be proudly worn and used for a lifetime.
AVAILABLE EXCLUSIVELY AT
CAREFREE BUFFALO

Features & Specs

  • One-hand button lock system
  • Leather carrying case
  • Shipped in an elegant wood presentation box
  • Dimensions: 
  • Blade 3.06" (77.7mm)
    Handle 4.13" (104.9.5mm)
    Overall open 7.19" (182.6mm)

Spearpoint Star Struck - Carefree Buffalo Exclusive B12 C.B. STAR STRUCK
$3,250.00
Out of Stock

Materials

Hand-forged damascus material image

Hand-forged damascus

Damascus steel was a term used by several Western cultures from the Medieval period onward to describe a type of steel created in India and used in swordmaking from about 300 BC to 1700 AD. These swords were characterized by distinctive patterns of banding and mottling reminiscent of flowing water. Such blades were reputed to be not only tough and resistant to shattering, but capable of being honed to a sharp and resilient edge. William Henry's damascus is made from several types of steel welded together to form a billet.
The patterns vary depending on how the damascus artist works the billet. The billet is drawn out and folded until the desired number of layers are formed. William Henry damascus billets are forged with a minimum of 300 layers. William Henry works with a handful of the very best damascus artists/forgers in the U.S.

Mokume gane material image

Mokume gane

Mokume gane was developed in the 1600s in Japan, allegedly by an Akita prefecture metalsmith named Denbei Shoami (1651 to 1728). He used the mokume gane technique to dress up samurai swords.
The mokume gane technique involves fusing several layers of different metals, and artistically exposing sections of lower layers. The metal is often made to display a pattern that mimics wood grain. A variety of metals can be used to give different arrays of coloration.
Layers of metal are pressed together and fused with heat. The forged layers are carved to expose lower layers and are then pressed again. The carving and pressing is repeated to develop the pattern. 

Today, some of the finest mokume in the world is made here in the USA, and William Henry is proud to offer a range of this material on our collections. Our mokume is generally made with copper, brass, and nickel silver in either a 45 or 89 layer billet, forged and patterned by hand.

Meteorite material image

Meteorite

William Henry uses beautiful sections of the Gibeon Meteorite, which fell in prehistoric times in Namibia. It was named after the nearest town: Gibeon
The fragments of the meteorite in the strewn field are dispersed over an elliptical area 171 miles long and 62 miles wide; it was discovered by the local Nama people and used by them to make tools and weapons.
In 1836 the English captain J. E. Alexander collected samples of the meteorite and sent them to London. There John Herschel analyzed them and confirmed for the first time the extraterrestrial nature of the material.

The Gibeon meteorite is composed of an iron-nickel alloy containing significant amounts of cobalt and phosphorus. The crystal structure of this meteorite provides a fine example of the Widmanstätten patterns: these figures of long nickel-iron crystals are of extraterrestrial origin, and cannot occur naturally on earth.  As a purely  natural material, the patterns may include small inclusions, distinctive and unique to each item we produce.

Citrine material image

Citrine

Citrine is a variety of quartz whose color ranges from a pale yellow to brown due to ferric impurities.
The name is derived from Latin citrina which means "yellow" and is also the origin of the word "citron." Sometimes citrine and amethyst can be found together in the same crystal, which is then referred to as ametrine. 

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