Free 2-Day shipping in the U.S. - Pay over time with

Antiquity

Edition of 100 pieces -
SKU
M4 ANTIQUITY
The Pharaoh 'Antiquity' features a frame in 24K gold koftgari (the ancient Indian art of inlaying gold or sterling silver in tool steel), inlaid with 10,000 year-old...
Read More
$650.00  
Pay over time with
Bread Checkout
 

The Pharaoh 'Antiquity' features a frame in 24K gold koftgari (the ancient Indian art of inlaying gold or sterling silver in tool steel), inlaid with 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tooth.  The clip is machined and blast-polished from tempered stainless steel, with a beautiful engraving bright cut against the matte-finished background. The Pharaoh money clip - inspired by the designs of ancient Egypt - draws on the elegant vessel forms of antiquity to create a simple yet striking range of possibilities, rendered in a variety of our hallmark materials and techniques. An elegant form with an enduring legacy.

Features & Specs

  • Mechanism: tension
  • Engraved serial number
Materials & Artistry
Fossil Mammoth tooth

Fossil Mammoth tooth

From a Woolly Mammoth that walked the Earth at least 10,000 years ago.
Modern humans coexisted with woolly mammoths during the Upper Paleolithic period when they entered Europe from Africa between 30,000 and 40,000 years ago. Prior to this, Neanderthals had coexisted with mammoths during the Middle Paleolithic and up to that time. Woolly mammoths were very important to Ice Age humans, and their survival may have depended on these animals in some areas.

The woolly mammoth is the next most depicted animal in Ice Age art after horses and bisons, and these images were produced up to 11,500 years ago. Today, more than five hundred depictions of woolly mammoths are known, in media ranging from carvings and cave paintings located in 46 caves in Russia, France and Spain, to sculptures and engravings made from different materials.

William Henry's fossil Mammoth tooth is harvested in Alaska and Siberia. It is a rare and mesmerizing material, a living testimony of the dawn of Mankind.

Koftgari

Koftgari

Koftgari is the name for fine gold (and/or silver) patterns inlaid into parkerized steel. This ancient Indian technique, done entirely by hand, involves creating a very fine cross-hatch grid in the steel and then burnishing 24K gold (and/or silver) into a pattern that is bound by the cross-hatch. Parkerizing involves soaking the steel in a boiling solution of salts to oxidize the steel a deep brown/blue. Beautiful and timeless, koftgari is nearly a lost art.

William Henry's koftgari comes from 2 small villages in India, home of the very few Indian artisans that still master this technique.