Free shipping in the continental U.S.
Monarch 'Oregon Pinot' Product Image
Monarch 'Oregon Pinot' Product Image
Monarch 'Oregon Pinot' Product Image
Double tap to zoom
Monarch 'Oregon Pinot' Product Thumbnail
Monarch 'Oregon Pinot' Product Thumbnail
Monarch 'Oregon Pinot' Product Thumbnail

Monarch 'Oregon Pinot'

Edition of 50 pieces
B05 OREGON PINOT

Monarch 'Oregon Pinot'

B05 OREGON PINOT

The 'Oregon Pinot' features a beautiful frame in 'Twist' mokume gane, inlaid with the wood from the original Eyrie pinot noir wood (the same vine that fathered the award-winning 'South Block' pinot noir of 1975). The blade is 'Wave' damascus steel with an extra strong core in ZDP-189; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with diamonds.

The Monarch is a simple design that is easy on the eye and effortless in the hand; the elegant shape of the handle on this design is a great place to showcase beautiful materials. The 'Oregon Pinot' is the perfect synthesis between elegance, function, and rare exotic materials

Features & Specs

  • One-hand button lock system
  • Leather carrying case
  • Shipped in an elegant wood presentation box
  • Dimensions: 
  • Blade 2.63" (66.8mm)
    Handle 3.58" (90.9mm)
    Overall open 6.00" (152.4mm)

Monarch 'Oregon Pinot'
Edition of 50 pieces
B05 OREGON PINOT
$1,475.00
Out of Stock

Materials

'Wave' Damascus with ZDP-189 material image

'Wave' Damascus with ZDP-189

William Henry's patent pending Wave Damascus features a ZDP-189 core (HRC 67) clad with alternating layers of stainless steel and nickel silver. The billet, 45 layers in all, is patterned with a custom die to create the undulating waves that emerge across the bevels of the blade. This material can be dark-etched for contrast, or etched and re-polished for a more subtle pattern.

Mokume gane material image

Mokume gane

Mokume gane was developed in the 1600s in Japan, allegedly by an Akita prefecture metalsmith named Denbei Shoami (1651 to 1728). He used the mokume gane technique to dress up samurai swords.
The mokume gane technique involves fusing several layers of different metals, and artistically exposing sections of lower layers. The metal is often made to display a pattern that mimics wood grain. A variety of metals can be used to give different arrays of coloration.
Layers of metal are pressed together and fused with heat. The forged layers are carved to expose lower layers and are then pressed again. The carving and pressing is repeated to develop the pattern. 

Today, some of the finest mokume in the world is made here in the USA, and William Henry is proud to offer a range of this material on our collections. Our mokume is generally made with copper, brass, and nickel silver in either a 45 or 89 layer billet, forged and patterned by hand.

Eyrie Vineyard pinot vine material image

Eyrie Vineyard pinot vine

In 1975, The Eyrie Vineyards produced the first American pinot noir to compete successfully in France with the renowned pinot noirs of Burgundy. Thanks to the close partnership with The Eyrie Vineyards, the 35 year old wood from that original and historic grapevine will live forever in a beautiful limited edition writing instrument by William Henry.

The Eyrie Vineyards was the first winemaker to grow pinot noir in Oregon’s Willamette Valley, where the temperatures, rainfall and day-lengths offer the grape its best home outside of Burgundy. In 1979, The Eyrie Vineyards placed in the top ten pinot noirs at the Olympiades des Vins in Paris. Surpassing hundreds of French winemakers, Eyrie’s pinot noir was the first American wine to successfully compete with the French Burgundies.
Hoping to overturn the rank achieved in Paris, a challenge tasting was restaged in Beaune in 1980, and to the wine world’s disbelief, Eyrie’s 1975 South Block Reserve came in only 2/10ths of a point below the winner, the 1959 Chambolle-Musigny from Joseph Drouhin.

The Eyrie Vineyards is a pioneer in American winemaking - a small business whose tireless and creative work has inspired and guided the United States among the most respected and top ranking wine producers in the world

Diamond material image

Diamond

The name diamond is derived from the ancient Greek αδάμας (adámas), "proper", "unalterable", "unbreakable". Diamonds have a long history as beautiful objects of desire. In the first century AD, the Roman naturalist Pliny stated: “Diamond is the most valuable, not only of precious stones, but of all things in this world.”

The world’s love of diamonds had its start in India, where diamonds were gathered from the country’s rivers and streams. Some historians estimate that India was trading in diamonds as early as the fourth century BC.
The popularity of diamonds has risen since the 19th century because of increased supply, improved cutting and polishing techniques. Aside from our jewelry collection, William Henry also inlays diamonds in pocketknives, pens, and money clips.

Explore our Instagram

#iamwilliamhenry