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Layla - Meteorite/Brown Product Image
Layla - Meteorite/Brown Product Image
Layla - Meteorite/Brown Product Image
Layla - Meteorite/Brown Product Image
Layla - Meteorite/Brown Product Image
Layla - Meteorite/Brown Product Image
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Layla - Meteorite/Brown Product Thumbnail
Layla - Meteorite/Brown Product Thumbnail
Layla - Meteorite/Brown Product Thumbnail
Layla - Meteorite/Brown Product Thumbnail
Layla - Meteorite/Brown Product Thumbnail

Layla - Meteorite/Brown

LC193 RRMET BRN

Layla - Meteorite/Brown

LC193 RRMET BRN

A fresh take on the classic ID bracelet, Layla features a centerpiece showcasing a section of the Gibeon meteorite which fell in the desert of Namibia in prehistoric times, and set into sterling silver. Sculpted “rock 'til you drop” sterling silver connectors and a magnetic clasp complete the appointments, all secured to an elegant leather strap that is double layered for a finished look inside and out. Beautiful everywhere you look, and a story on your wrist that resonates across all lines. Back of centerpiece is engravable.

Layla - Meteorite/Brown LC193 RRMET BRN
$995.00
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$995.00

Materials

Sculpted sterling silver material image

Sculpted sterling silver

Sculpted Sterling is finely cast to in our jewelry shop using state-of-the-art techniques and equipment to obtain a mesmerizing level of detail.

Meteorite material image

Meteorite

William Henry uses beautiful sections of the Gibeon Meteorite, which fell in prehistoric times in Namibia. It was named after the nearest town: Gibeon
The fragments of the meteorite in the strewn field are dispersed over an elliptical area 171 miles long and 62 miles wide; it was discovered by the local Nama people and used by them to make tools and weapons.
In 1836 the English captain J. E. Alexander collected samples of the meteorite and sent them to London. There John Herschel analyzed them and confirmed for the first time the extraterrestrial nature of the material.

The Gibeon meteorite is composed of an iron-nickel alloy containing significant amounts of cobalt and phosphorus. The crystal structure of this meteorite provides a fine example of the Widmanstätten patterns: these figures of long nickel-iron crystals are of extraterrestrial origin, and cannot occur naturally on earth.  As a purely  natural material, the patterns may include small inclusions, distinctive and unique to each item we produce.

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