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Rogue Moray

Edition of 250 pieces
C15 MORAY

Rogue Moray

C15 MORAY

Blade is crafted from hand-forged stainless 'Ripple' damascus steel by Chad Nichols. Handle is aerospace grade titanium, with inlays of hand-forged Mokume Gane by Mike Sakmar. Our Mokume features 89 layers of copper, brass and nickel silver twisted into elegant patterns. Citrine gems adorn the thumb stud and lock button. Damascus was used on early Samurai swords, and Mokume was developed to adorn the hilts. We offer this homage to a proud tradition.

Features & Specs

  • One-hand button lock system
  • Leather carrying case
  • Shipped in an elegant wood presentation box
  • Dimensions: 
  • Blade 3.88" (98.5mm)
    Handle 4.63" (117.6mm)
    Overall open 7.75" (196.8mm)

Rogue Moray
Edition of 250 pieces
C15 MORAY
$1,375.00

Materials

Hand-forged damascus

Damascus steel was a term used by several Western cultures from the Medieval period onward to describe a type of steel created in India and used in swordmaking from about 300 BC to 1700 AD. These swords were characterized by distinctive patterns of banding and mottling reminiscent of flowing water. Such blades were reputed to be not only tough and resistant to shattering, but capable of being honed to a sharp and resilient edge. William Henry's damascus is made is made from several types of steel welded together to form a billet.
The patterns vary depending on how the damascus artist works the billet. The billet is drawn out and folded until the desired number of layers are formed. William Henry damascus billets are forged with a minimum of 300 layers. William Henry works with a handful of the very best damascus artists/forgers in the U.S.

Mokume gane

Mokume gane was developed in the 1600s in Japan, allegedly by an Akita prefecture metalsmith named Denbei Shoami (1651 to 1728). He used the mokume gane technique to dress up samurai swords.
The mokume gane technique involves fusing several layers of different metals, and artistically exposing sections of lower layers. The metal is often made to display a pattern that mimics wood grain. A variety of metals can be used to give different arrays of coloration.
Layers of metal are pressed together and fused with heat. The forged layers are carved to expose lower layers and are then pressed again. The carving and pressing is repeated to develop the pattern. 

Today, some of the finest mokume in the world is made here in the USA, and William Henry is proud to offer a range of this material on our collections. Our mokume is generally made with copper, brass, and nickel silver in either a 45 or 89 layer billet, forged and patterned by hand.

Titanium

Titanium is a low density, strong, lustrous, corrosion-resistant (including sea water, aqua regia and chlorine) metal with a silver color.
It was discovered in Great Britain by William Gregor in 1791, and named by Martin Heinrich Klaproth for the Titans of Greek mythology

William Henry uses only aerospace-grade titanium alloy for our frames, clips, and micro-fasteners. Called 6Al/4V, it is titanium with a little aluminum and vanadium added in for additional toughness and tensile strength.

Citrine

Citrine is a variety of quartz whose color ranges from a pale yellow to brown due to ferric impurities.
The name is derived from Latin citrina which means "yellow" and is also the origin of the word "citron." Sometimes citrine and amethyst can be found together in the same crystal, which is then referred to as ametrine. 

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