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Spearpoint Crush

Edition of 250 pieces
B12 CRUSH

Spearpoint Crush

B12 CRUSH

The Spearpoint ‘Crush’ features frame heat-blued, hand-forged 'Moku-Ti' frame by Chad Nichols, a titanium laminate consisting of 6AL-4V and commercially pure Titanium. The scales are 'crushed' carbon fiber; the blade is 'Boomerang' damascus by Chad Nichols; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with blue sapphire gemstones.
A remarkable design that gives you an instrument with a full-size secure grip, and a versatile deep-belly blade, the Spearpoint epitomizes William Henry’s core philosophy – that superlative function deserves to be elevated to superlative art.
The ‘Crush’ features the perfect balance between elegance, function, and hi-tech materials; a distinctive personality statement to be worn and used for a lifetime.

Features & Specs

  • One-hand button lock system
  • Leather clip case
  • Shipped in an elegant wood presentation box
  • Dimensions: 
  • Blade 3.06" (77.7mm)
    Handle 4.13" (104.9.5mm)
    Overall open 7.19" (182.6mm)

Spearpoint Crush
Edition of 250 pieces
B12 CRUSH
$1,750.00
Out of Stock

Materials

Hand-forged damascus material image

Hand-forged damascus

Damascus steel was a term used by several Western cultures from the Medieval period onward to describe a type of steel created in India and used in swordmaking from about 300 BC to 1700 AD. These swords were characterized by distinctive patterns of banding and mottling reminiscent of flowing water. Such blades were reputed to be not only tough and resistant to shattering, but capable of being honed to a sharp and resilient edge. William Henry's damascus is made from several types of steel welded together to form a billet.
The patterns vary depending on how the damascus artist works the billet. The billet is drawn out and folded until the desired number of layers are formed. William Henry damascus billets are forged with a minimum of 300 layers. William Henry works with a handful of the very best damascus artists/forgers in the U.S.

Moku-Ti material image

Moku-Ti

Similar to the technique used to forge damascus, Moku-ti is created with several layers of 6AI/4V Titanium and CP Titanium, fused and welded together to form a billet. The layered section is then artistically exposed revealing patterns of banding and mottling reminiscent of flowing water, or mimicking the layered design of wood grain.
The patterns vary depending on the blacksmith that works the billet. Our Moku-Ti billets are forged with a minimum of 300 layers by a handful of the very best blacksmiths/artists in the U.S.

Titanium material image

Titanium

Titanium is a low density, strong, lustrous, corrosion-resistant (including sea water, aqua regia and chlorine) metal with a silver color.
It was discovered in Great Britain by William Gregor in 1791, and named by Martin Heinrich Klaproth for the Titans of Greek mythology

William Henry uses only aerospace-grade titanium alloy for our frames, clips, and micro-fasteners. Called 6Al/4V, it is titanium with a little aluminum and vanadium added in for additional toughness and tensile strength.

Carbon Fiber material image

Carbon Fiber

Carbon fiber is a material consisting of microscopic fibers composed mostly of carbon atoms. The carbon atoms are bonded together in crystals that are more or less aligned parallel to the long axis of the fiber. The crystal alignment gives the fiber high strength-to-volume ratio. Several thousand carbon fibers are bundled together to form a tow, which may be used by itself or woven into a fabric.
Carbon fiber's properties, such as high stiffness, high tensile strength, low weight, high chemical resistance, high temperature tolerance, make them very popular in aerospace, civil engineering, military, competition sports. William Henry uses the highest grade, and beautifully textured carbon fiber for its collections of jewelry, knives, money clips and cufflinks.

Sapphire material image

Sapphire

Traditionally, sapphire symbolizes nobility, truth, sincerity, and faithfulness. It has decorated the robes of royalty and clergy members for centuries. Its extraordinary color is the standard against which other blue gems—from topaz to tanzanite—are measured. In ancient Greece and Rome, kings and queens were convinced that blue sapphires protected their owners from envy and harm. For centuries, sapphire has also been associated with royalty and romance. The association was reinforced in 1981, when Britain’s Prince Charles gave a blue sapphire engagement ring to Lady Diana Spencer. 
William Henry uses the highest quality sapphires, selected and cut by Swarovski Gems. 

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