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INACTIVE

KB1 M**DO NOT USE

INACTIVE

KB1 M**DO NOT USE

Black Kevlar 6mm (1/4") bracelet with with bead and bolt-action clasp. Fittings in hand-forged mokume gane with inset spessartite gemstone.

William Henry's jewelry collection showcases our work with rare and storied materials, and exceptional craftsmanship, blended with intricate and symbolic stylings in sterling silver, interwoven with exotic and unique forged metals derived from the ancient arts of sword-making.
Designed and hand-crafted in the United States, every piece of this collection makes a bold, yet extremely refined statement, and speaks to a strong and masculine personality.

INACTIVE KB1 M**DO NOT USE
$385.00
Out of Stock

Materials

Mokume gane material image

Mokume gane

Mokume gane was developed in the 1600s in Japan, allegedly by an Akita prefecture metalsmith named Denbei Shoami (1651 to 1728). He used the mokume gane technique to dress up samurai swords.
The mokume gane technique involves fusing several layers of different metals, and artistically exposing sections of lower layers. The metal is often made to display a pattern that mimics wood grain. A variety of metals can be used to give different arrays of coloration.
Layers of metal are pressed together and fused with heat. The forged layers are carved to expose lower layers and are then pressed again. The carving and pressing is repeated to develop the pattern. 

Today, some of the finest mokume in the world is made here in the USA, and William Henry is proud to offer a range of this material on our collections. Our mokume is generally made with copper, brass, and nickel silver in either a 45 or 89 layer billet, forged and patterned by hand.

Kevlar material image

Kevlar

Kevlar is the registered trademark for a synthetic fiber developed at DuPont in 1965. This high-strength material was first commercially used in the early 1970s as a replacement for steel in racing tires. Typically it is spun into ropes or fabric sheets offering many applications, ranging from bicycle tires and racing sails to body armor. Because of its high tensile strength-to-weight ratio it is 5 times stronger than steel.

Kevlar is also a well-known component of personal armor such as combat helmets, ballistic face masks, and ballistic vests. William Henry uses woven Kevlar to create necklaces and bracelets which offer unparalleled strength and comfort.

Spessartite material image

Spessartite

Spessartite is an orange to red-brown gemstone that belongs to the large and varied garnet species. While it was once just a collector's gem, spessartite, an orange variety of garnet, made its move into the mainstream during the 1990s when new deposits were discovered in Africa.
Like most garnets, spessartite is typically untreated, so the beautiful color and clarity that you see in them is just as nature created it. Spessartite garnet is named after its first discovery in Spessart, Bavaria, in the mid 1800's.

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