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Cabernet 1103

Edition of 250 pieces
RB8 1103

Cabernet 1103

RB8 1103

The Cabernet 1103 is a beautiful rollerball pen featuring a barrel in 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth bone, and a light structure in aerospace grade titanium and aluminum. The accents on the ebonite cap are in Mokume Gane and the pocket clip is set with citrine. This beautiful writing instrument also features William Henry's patent-pending Wavelock™ cap closure system – a ring of chromium steel balls which are captured in wave-shaped grooves for closed and post positions.
The Cabernet 1103 is a limited worldwide edition of 250 pieces. This is one of William Henry's most meaningful and rare writing instruments; each one imbued with a distinct and unique personality.

Features & Specs

  • Wavelock™ Closure System
  • Shipped in an elegant wood presentation box

Cabernet 1103
Edition of 250 pieces
RB8 1103
$1,250.00
Out of Stock

Materials

Mokume gane material image

Mokume gane

Mokume gane was developed in the 1600s in Japan, allegedly by an Akita prefecture metalsmith named Denbei Shoami (1651 to 1728). He used the mokume gane technique to dress up samurai swords.
The mokume gane technique involves fusing several layers of different metals, and artistically exposing sections of lower layers. The metal is often made to display a pattern that mimics wood grain. A variety of metals can be used to give different arrays of coloration.
Layers of metal are pressed together and fused with heat. The forged layers are carved to expose lower layers and are then pressed again. The carving and pressing is repeated to develop the pattern. 

Today, some of the finest mokume in the world is made here in the USA, and William Henry is proud to offer a range of this material on our collections. Our mokume is generally made with copper, brass, and nickel silver in either a 45 or 89 layer billet, forged and patterned by hand.

Titanium material image

Titanium

Titanium is a low density, strong, lustrous, corrosion-resistant (including sea water, aqua regia and chlorine) metal with a silver color.
It was discovered in Great Britain by William Gregor in 1791, and named by Martin Heinrich Klaproth for the Titans of Greek mythology

William Henry uses only aerospace-grade titanium alloy for our frames, clips, and micro-fasteners. Called 6Al/4V, it is titanium with a little aluminum and vanadium added in for additional toughness and tensile strength.

Fossil Mammoth Bone material image

Fossil Mammoth Bone

From a Woolly Mammoth that walked the Earth at least 10,000 years ago.

Modern humans coexisted with woolly mammoths during the Upper Paleolithic period when they entered Europe from Africa between 30,000 and 40,000 years ago. Prior to this, Neanderthals had coexisted with mammoths during the Middle Paleolithic and up to that time. Woolly mammoths were very important to Ice Age humans, and their survival may have depended on these animals in some areas.

The woolly mammoth is the next most depicted animal in Ice Age art after horses and bisons, and these images were produced up to 11.500 years ago. Today, more than five hundred depictions of woolly mammoths are known, in media ranging from carvings and cave paintings located in 46 caves in Russia, France and Spain, to sculptures and engravings made from different materials.

William Henry's fossil Mammoth bone is harvested in Alaska and Siberia. It is a rare and mesmerizing material, a living testimony of the dawn of Mankind.

Citrine material image

Citrine

Citrine is a variety of quartz whose color ranges from a pale yellow to brown due to ferric impurities.
The name is derived from Latin citrina which means "yellow" and is also the origin of the word "citron." Sometimes citrine and amethyst can be found together in the same crystal, which is then referred to as ametrine. 

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