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Tortuga

SKU
BR8 FC
Sometimes the right centerpiece is all you need. The 'Tortuga' features a striking sterling silver assembly inlaid with our 100,000 year old fossil coral. This material...
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Sometimes the right centerpiece is all you need. The 'Tortuga' features a striking sterling silver assembly inlaid with our 100,000 year old fossil coral. This material was found in an abandoned lime pit in the Florida Keys, and there is a very limited supply that features the remarkable color and pattern seen here. Sterling silver links and crimps connect to a supple and soft tactical cord around the wrist, with a sterling silver clasp assembly. Reminiscent of the heraldry of yore, with 100,000 years of history.

Features & Specs

Sterling & fossil coral center piece: 11/16" square

Wrist size

Inches | Centimeters

Jewelry Size

15.5 - 16.8 Small
17.15 - 18.4 Medium
18.75 - 20 Large
20.3 - 21.6 X-Large
21.9 - 23.18 2X-Large
6 1/8 - 6 5/8 Small
6 3/4 - 7 1/4 Medium
7 3/8 - 7 7/8 Large
8 - 8 1/2 X-Large
8 5/8 - 9 1/8 2X-Large

 

Wrist sizing chart Image

Materials & Artistry
Sterling Silver

Sterling Silver

Sterling silver is an alloy of silver containing 92.5% by mass of silver and usually 7.5% by mass of copper. The sterling silver standard has a minimum millesimal fineness of 925. The sterling alloy originated in continental Europe and was being used for commerce as early as the 12th century in the area that is now northern Germany. William Henry uses the latest state-of-the-art casting equipment to create mesmerizing pieces that are often considered par with our hand-carved work.

Fossil Coral

Fossil Coral

According to geologists, this fossil coral is approximately 110,000 years old.  Found in abundance in Florida quarry mines, these exquisite scales are hand-picked findings which would otherwise be crushed and used in cement.   Fossil coral is not living coral, therefore has no odors.

Tactical paracord

Tactical paracord

Parachute cord or 'paracord' is a lightweight nylon kernmantle rope originally used in the suspension lines of parachutes. This cord is useful for many other tasks and is now used as a general purpose utility cord by both military personnel and civilians. This versatile cord was even used by astronauts during the 82nd Space Shuttle mission to repair the Hubble Space Telescope.
The braided sheath has a high number of interwoven strands for its size, giving it high resistance and a relatively smooth texture.